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  • The Vermont Natural Burial Team

Hello again!

One thing we've heard is how important a natural burial is to people. Natural burial, on land dedicated to natural burial, is what everyone on our team wants for themselves as well. Why is that? Well, for some of us it's because it's a chance to create a relationship with a piece of land that demonstrates the natural beauty of Vermont. For one, it's the chance to continue to nourish the relationship to our natural environment that has been a part of living in Vermont starting with its first indigenous communities. For another, it's the symbolic act of giving our bodies to that land, becoming a part of the natural history and future of a wild and open space. And, for others, it is the simple completion natural burial offers- nourishing the land that has nourished us.


We also deeply care about the community a natural burial cemetery can create and sustain. One where local Vermont craftspeople can create products sourced from the land; where local musicians, poets, artists, and clergy can create ceremonies inspired by the land; and one where educators and families can learn about native plants, trees, animals, and cycles of life on the land.

What makes natural burial and a space dedicated to natural burial important to you? Write us and let us know! If you know people who are interested in natural burial please tell them about Vermont Natural Burial and direct them to our website vermontnaturalburial.org so that they can join our mailing list and keep up to date with all of the developments at the cemetery.


Thank you,

The Vermont Natural Burial Team

  • The Vermont Natural Burial Team

Hello!


We've been a little quiet these past few weeks, but with the arrival of the first snowfall of the season we figured many of you might be wondering about what happens with natural burial in the winter. And the answer is- it continues to happen! Most conventional cemeteries in Vermont close for the winter. We've heard a lot of stories as to why, but one of the big reason is the safety of moving heavy equipment around. Since natural burial doesn't utilize machines to dig, that's not a problem. Another obvious problem with winter burials is the frozen ground. However, in our cemetery we will thaw the ground. Even though it damages the soil microorganisms, when the spring comes, the body itself will help replenish them. What other questions do you have about natural burial? Don't hesitate to write and let us know. As always, we need your help! Please tell people about Vermont Natural Burial and direct them to our website vermontnaturalburial.org so that they can join our mailing list and keep up to date with all of the developments at the cemetery.


Thank you,

The Vermont Natural Burial Team

  • The Vermont Natural Burial Team

Hello from the Vermont Natural Burial Team! It's wonderful to see new subscribers. As always, please help us get the word out about Vermont Natural burial by sharing our website vermontnaturalburial.org so that people can join this mailing list. We know there are so many people we haven't reached! From time to time in this newsletter we'll share some talking points/statistics to help you start the conversation about the benefits of natural burial. Ready for the first one? Did you know that every year 1.6 million tons of concrete are used in conventional cemeteries in the US? Concrete is used as a base for traditional style markers and is the most common form of material for burial vaults, also know as grave liners. Why does it matter? Well a concrete grave liner separates the body from the soil. If the body and the soil don't come into contact fairly quickly after burial, the natural aerobic process of decomposition doesn't take place. Without this, the nutrients can't return to the ecosystem. It also matters because concrete is bad for the soil - worse than formeldahyde, chemotherapy drugs, and antibiotics.

Why? Well because all of those can be broken down by the soil into their simple building blocks and either reabsorbed into or held in place by the soil. Concrete, on other hand, produces a leachate, which overwhelms the soil ability to hold it in place causing it to be able to move through the soil and potentially contaminate ground water with its high pH level and chemical components that the soil has not had time to break down. Do you have any questions for us? What makes you interested in Natural Burial. Drop us a line and let us know!


Thank you,

The Vermont Natural Burial Team