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Hi from Vermont Natural Burial, Our goal for our email list is to send updates about what is happening at VNB and our cemetery, and provide some tidbits about natural burial. We recently integrated some mailing lists and made some updates on our website. And it turns out many of you got emails for every. single. change. (Sometimes as it was happening in real time.) And you hung in with us- broken links and all- not one of you unsubscribed. Thank you! We're natural burial people and the technology side of things doesn't come... well, naturally, to us. We're learning as we go and appreciate your patience. Please don't hesitate to bring glitches to our attention. The good news is that all these newsletters are now archived on the website. So if you missed some or want to review an older one you don't have to dig through your email to find it. We're in an important building phase and now, more than ever, we need your help to connect with natural burial supporters. Please share our any of our newsletter or our website vermontnaturalburial.org so that folks can learn about us and join our mailing list. We know there are more people out there who are curious about natural burial and our cemetery, but we can't reach them without your help spreading the word.


Thank you,

The Vermont Natural Burial Team

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Hi from Vermont Natural Burial! If you've decided you want to have a natural burial there are three easy things you can do to make sure your wishes are carried out. Number one: Appoint an "Agent of Disposition" Similar to a health care agent, who can make decisions about what happens to your body when you are alive, an agent of disposition is responsible for making decisions about what happens to your body after you die. An agent of disposition can be your next of kin, or anyone you trust to oversee your disposition, and can be the same person as your health care agent. Naming someone your agent of disposition gives them the legal authority to carry out your after-death wishes. A good advance directive form should include a place for you to designate your agent of disposition. Number two: Plan ahead While it is possible to arrange a natural burial at the time of death, it is much less stressful for the people carrying out your disposition if you plan ahead and document your wishes in an advance directive. Planning ahead should include appointing an agent of disposition, choosing where you want to be buried and how, documenting your wishes, and talking to the people who matter to you about your choices. Number three: Tell people about Vermont Natural Burial! We know we put this in every newsletter, but helping us spread the word about VNB and our mission is best thing you can do to help us help you have a natural burial at our cemetery. So please, tell people about Vermont Natural Burial and direct them to our website vermontnaturalburial.org so that they can join our mailing list and learn more about natural burial and our cemetery. Do you have questions for us about planning for a natural burial? We'd love to hear them.

Thank you,


The Vermont Natural Burial Team

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  • The Vermont Natural Burial Team

Hello from Vermont Natural Burial!


Many people who are interested in natural burial are concerned about the environment. Natural burial offers a chance to make ecologically responsible decisions about what happens to your body after you die. Many people have heard that cremation is more environmentally friendly than conventional burial practices that involve embalming, concrete grave liners, and caskets made of rare hardwoods. While that's true, cremation still uses a lot of fossil fuel and releases large amounts of greenhouse gasses. However, for many people, cremation is simple, affordable, and the best choice for them. So, can you be cremated and buried at our natural cemetery? The answer is yes. Unlike the bone meal we buy for our gardens, ashes after cremation are not good for the soil because the heat of the process locks in the calcium and potassium. They also have a pH of 11.4 and are very salty. But, there are several ways ashes can be buried at our cemetery. Ashes, in a biodegradable urn or without a container, can be buried at a depth of about 5 feet, below the active layers of the soils to protect the roots, microorganisms, and mycelia closer to the surface. Ashes can also be amended to help neutralize the pH, offset the sodium, and "unlock" the calcium and potassium, and then buried or turned into the soil. Finally, ashes can be scattered in symbolic amounts in our designated scattering section or at a grave of a loved one.

Are you interested in learning more about how your disposition can have a minimal environmental impact? Let us know what your questions are and we'll address them in an upcoming newsletter.

Help us spread the word about Vermont Natural Burial by telling people about our website vermontnaturalburial.org and mailing list.

Thank you,

The Vermont Natural Burial Team

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